May 2020 at the Hastings Park sanctuary

May 2020 at the Hastings Park sanctuary

Text and Photos by Doug Cooper

It was a great May for birding and nature in general at the Hastings Park sanctuary.  As May came to a close, the sanctuary was much quieter than earlier in the month, both in volume and variety of bird song as well as in numbers and species of birds.  Eight types of warblers were reported during the month:  Yellow, Yellow-rumped (of both subspecies types), MacGillivray’s, Wilson’s, Orange-crowned, Black-throated Grey, Townsend’s and Common Yellowthroat.  At times it seemed as if every bush and tree had two, if not three, Wilson’s Warblers in it and their sewing-machine songs filled the air.  There were a few one-day-wonders with a Solitary Sandpiper being present for a day in late April as well as a Spotted Sandpiper and a Green Heron being seen for one day on separate days in mid May.  A cluster of pretty but invasive Yellow Irises has become established at the southern edge of the pond.  The Bald Eagles on the south side of Hastings St have managed to raise at least one fledgling.
I’ve encountered a few more birders than usual enjoying the offerings at the sanctuary.  Their sharp eyes and ears have added to the sightings posted on eBird.

Here’s a few photos from late April and May
1) Cassin’s Vireo 2) Yellow Irises 3) Bald Eagle adult and fledgling 4) Swainson’s Thrushes have shown up in the last couple of weeks, heard more often than seen 5) There have been up to three raccoons at a time being scolded by the local crows. 6) Western Wood-pewee 7.) Distant cropped blurred photo of the Green Heron 8.Nootka Rose 9) Warbling Vireo 10) Female Wilson’s Warbler 11) A pair of juvenile-plumaged Cooper’s Hawks have built a nest high up in a Horse Chestnut tree 12) Pacific-slope Flycatcher 13) Pacific Ninebark blossom

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