Geology of Caulfeild Park and the coastline of Burrard Inlet -30 July 2019

Geology of Caulfeild Park and the coastline of Burrard Inlet -30 July 2019

Trip Report by Leader David Cook

Sixteen members attended this walkabout of the rocky bluffs of Caulfeild Park, West Vancouver. It was a joint event for Nature Vancouver and the Lighthouse Park Preservation Society. The weather was perfect which allowed easy walking over the smoothed rocky bluffs which would have been slippery if it had been raining. This location shows us a beautiful example of an intrusion breccia and illustrates, frozen in time, how the granitoid rocks of the North Shore and north to Alaska were formed. Looking across Burrard Inlet I explained some of the geological land forms that were visible.

The group was also interested to learn about what remains of this very delicate coastal bluff ecosystem and how it has been heavily impacted by human activity. The only plants in flower on the bluffs were the native entire-leaved gumweed (Grindelia integrifolia) and red sand spurry (Spergularia macrotheca). Both are tolerant to salt spray. The hardy Wallace’s selaginella (Selaginella wallacei) is also fairly common as brown sun-scorched mats in protected rock clefts. Away from the bluffs but still in the park, brave attempts have been made by the Lighthouse Park Preservation Society to remove invasive species such as Himalayan blackberry and replant with native shrubs. Planting with native trees has met with less success due to locals aggressively removing plantings in fear of losing views.

Photo by David Cook
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